WordPress Review

I’ve finished installing and configuring this blog to run using WordPress. I was disappointed in the process – it was much more difficult to configure than I had expected. On the positive side, it reinforces my thoughts about creating simplicity for the developer as well as the end-user.

One of the things we’re focusing on in our new Content Editing System (code-named “Ted”) is making it extremely easy to use and customize. We have a few advantages over something like WordPress (or MovableType) including the fact that I’m not planning to distribute it so it doesn’t need to be “installable,” and customizations can be tailored to a particular audience: the front-end developer.

The challenge a lot of these CMS’s face (for my use) is that they are aimed at authors and back-end programmers. With that, it’s difficult to edit the front-end, and you really need to get into it to edit the backend. I want my CMS to be developed for front-end programmers.

Previously, Orum.com ran on a hybrid of WordPress and Ted, but I wanted to try to extend WordPress a bit more and have everything run through the same system. I also wanted to build something like Tom Peter’s “TP Wire Service,” which should theoretically be easy using reblog. It is easy, but it unfortunately just dumps the links into the main blog. I think MovableType is probably a better solution for this, since it has easy support for multiple blogs on one system.

I think WordPress is an awesome program if you’re simply an author or focused on PHP programming. I’m neither – that is, I am an author and I know PHP programming, but that’s not my expertise.

Edit:

I’ve also added a number of plugins. My experience with these has been awesome. WordPress makes it super easy to add extensions, and pretty easy to develop your own. I have plugins that underline acronyms, automatically add links to preset words, hide my e-mail from spambots (I need to modify this one), and do a bunch of other things. I added my own that adds that nice little edit line above.